Perspectum Launches the First COVID-19 Recovery Study

Date
April 21, 2020
Topics

Oxford, 21st April 2020. Perspectum, the leading medical imaging company, is launching the first study to map how COVID-19 impacts the health of multiple organs and identify at-risk features for the virus, with detailed cross-sectional imaging and genetic studies. This study has received approval following expedited ethics review.

The primary objective is to determine the prevalence and degree of lung, heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and spleen injury in a cohort of patients recovering from COVID-19 disease, using multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Over a period of 24 months, the study aims to recruit over 500 patients recovering from COVID-19 disease following SARS-CoV-2 infection.

The research also seeks to assess change in the health of multiple organs and whether genetic traits may influence recovery. The study will use outpatient MRI facilities and involve blood tests, basic physical measurements (height, weight, blood pressure) and online questionnaires.

We lack comprehensive knowledge of the medium to long term effect of SARS-CoV-2 infection on organ health.  Initial reports suggest, however, that there is evidence of organ damage in those being discharged following severe COVID-19 disease.  Through this study, we want to gain a better understanding of the impact of this disease by mapping the extent of organ health.  In doing so, we hope to further support global efforts in planning for ongoing health-care needs. The COVERSCAN study has been designed to safely assess patients, using non-invasive imaging, with minimal risk to all involved.“ comments Mary Xu, Head of Clinical Affairs at Perspectum.

SARS-CoV-2 infection is known to cause damage to organs such as the heart, kidneys, liver and the haematological and immune systems. However, the extent, and expected long-term impact, of this organ health/damage has not been characterised. Patients recovering from serious disease will pose a huge, ongoing challenge.